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Monday, May 2

  1. page home edited ... Adolescents' perception of bullying: who is the victim? who is the bully? What can be done to …
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    Adolescents' perception of bullying: who is the victim? who is the bully? What can be done to stop bullying?
    http://ehis.ebscohost.com.navigator-millersville.passhe.edu/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=5&hid=1&sid=14c4dcc3-3591-489e-8233-25a7e7a43625%40sessionmgr10
    As per the question, if I were an adolescence expert, I would suggest the following 10 steps to schools to eliminate the practice of bullying..
    1) defining bullying
    2) knowing how bullying manifests in action
    3) why someone becomes a bully
    4) understanding the effects it has on victims
    5) understanding the effects it has on other school/class mates/general school environment
    6) addressing the causes of someone becoming a bully
    7) taking action on bullies
    8) taking care of victims
    9) establishing rules and an atmosphere that makes bullying a strange occurrence
    10) following up and reviewing

    Why does someone become a bully?
    Much of our discussion looks at the bully as a criminal even when we know that the bully is also in a stage of development. Dr. Nathaniel Branden, a psychotherapist quotes (nathanielbranden.com) that a bully is emotionally weak and hides his fears and insecurities behind the mask of dominance. Addressing the emotional state and needs of a bully is a crucial step in addressing the issue of bullying.
    (view changes)
    1:33 pm
  2. page Question 3 edited ... Identifying a purpose and searching for a purpose in life is associated with greater life sati…
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    Identifying a purpose and searching for a purpose in life is associated with greater life satisfaction. Hiope was found to be signifcantly related to purpose - identifying with a purpose and knowing one has the ability to attain leads to increased satisfaction with life. This is just a very brief summary of the findings of this study.
    {Does a lack of meaning cause boredom - Results from psychometric, longitudinal, and experimental analyses.pdf}
    ...
    at the
    relationship
    relationship between life
    ...
    a bidirectional causal
    relationship.
    relationship.
    - also emphasized is that boredom has not been thoroughly studied because it "sounds trivial, inconsequential, or simply uninteresting, and is not studied or taken seriously as a result. However, boredom is associated with serious psychological and physical health difficulties, and should not be taken lightly or dismissed (Fahlman, Mercer, Eastwood, & Eastwood, 2009, p. 335).
    - "To assist individuals who are experiencing boredom-either in clinical or nonclinical contexts-it may be important to target their sense of life meaning, as it is clearly one important factor in producing feelings of boredom" (p. 336).
    (view changes)
    1:04 pm
  3. page Question 3 edited ... Abstract: Like all feeling states, happiness is an evolutionary adaptation, responding to the …
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    Abstract: Like all feeling states, happiness is an evolutionary adaptation, responding to the biological imperative to survive and reproduce. Unlike some feelings, it is complex, comprising a balanced combination of elements from each of the three mental structures initially hypothesized by Freud in 1923 and supported in recent years by neuroscientific research. A particular challenge to happiness posed by modern society is the problem of addiction. Addictions in the id, ego, and superego are defined, and therapeutic approaches to these and other obstacles to happiness are described
    Goldwater, E. (2010). Happiness: a structural theory. In , Modern Psychoanalysis (pp. 147-163). Center for Modern Psychoanalytic Studies. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.
    _
    

    Shernoff, D. J., Csikszentmihalyi, M., Shneider, B., & Shernoff, E. (2003). Student engagement in high school classrooms from the perspective of flow theory. School Psychology Quarterly, 18(2), 158-176.
    {2003-07012-007.pdf}
    (view changes)
    12:56 pm
  4. page Question 7 edited ... selfconcept and self esteem.pdf This article argues that schools should focus on promoting a…
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    selfconcept and self esteem.pdf
    This article argues that schools should focus on promoting an adolescent's self-concept rather than developing programs to enhance self-esteem. The author claims that when a student is feeling competent and supported, their self-esteem will increase. She offers strategies and interventions for teachers to implement to foster success in this area.
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    February, 11-15. :): ) Really awesome article!
    Self esteem is the evaluation our personality, characteristics, abilities (Branden, 1989).
    Self esteem consists of 2 components : self efficacy (belief in our ability to succeed), self worth (belief in our worth to succeed) Self-worth is synonymous/nearly synonymous with self-esteem
    (view changes)
    12:53 pm
  5. page Question 7 edited ... selfconcept and self esteem.pdf This article argues that schools should focus on promoting a…
    ...
    selfconcept and self esteem.pdf
    This article argues that schools should focus on promoting an adolescent's self-concept rather than developing programs to enhance self-esteem. The author claims that when a student is feeling competent and supported, their self-esteem will increase. She offers strategies and interventions for teachers to implement to foster success in this area.
    ...
    February, 11-15. :)
    Self esteem is the evaluation our personality, characteristics, abilities (Branden, 1989).
    Self esteem consists of 2 components : self efficacy (belief in our ability to succeed), self worth (belief in our worth to succeed) Self-worth is synonymous/nearly synonymous with self-esteem
    (view changes)
    12:52 pm
  6. page Question 3 edited ... The need to belong, a sense of community, team work, making a difference in people's lives, se…
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    The need to belong, a sense of community, team work, making a difference in people's lives, self expression (McMahan, 2009)
    To do more than just survive, but to thrive and enjoy life, here are six things you should look for in yourself:
    The basic goals of positive youth development:
    competence -- do you feel that you can act effectively? resolve conflicts, making effective decisions, study productively?
    confidence -- do you feel positively about yourself and your self-efficacy?
    ...
    caring -- do you feel compassion for others?
    contribution -- do you contribute to your family, school, community?
    (McMahan (2009), pg. 472)
    Study on psychosocial factors of happiness in adolescents :
    http://www.eurojournals.com/ejss_12_4_13.pdf
    (view changes)
    12:40 pm
  7. page Question 5 edited ... Attachment and Autonomy as Predictors of the Development of Social Skills and Delinquency Duri…
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    Attachment and Autonomy as Predictors of the Development of Social Skills and Delinquency During Midadolescence.mht
    This study found that adolescent attachment organization at age 16 predicted relative changes in levels of social skills and delinquent behavior. Overall attachment insecurity predicted decreases in social skills, and attachment preoccupation predicted relative increases in delinquency when it occurred in conjunction with high levels of maternal autonomy.
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    70(1), 56-66.
    The literature on puberty and girls was also very relatable to me as I thought about my own experiences.
    -Most girls feel embarrassment, self-consciousness, and worry about the hassle of supplies after their experience with menarche (Ruble & Brooks-Gunn, 1982).
    ...
    http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/marilynm/Theorizing_Black_America_Syllabus_files/Ogbu%27s%20theory%20of%20academic%20disengagement.pdf
    http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=jCnRG-jS_rAC&oi=fnd&pg=PA19&dq=ogbu&ots=WvYbbnPEOv&sig=R5Rl3PHw0B816CZDVtU44FgZPGg#v=onepage&q=ogbu&f=false
    From text (McMahan, 2009)
    Peer influence:
    Conformity - doing as others are doing or as others urge one to do, whether of not it fits with personal inclinations, values, and beliefs
    - study by Solomon Asch (1953) - college students asked to jude which of 3 lines was the same length as another line - after several rounds, the other participants gave the wrong answer on purpose to see how the other participant would respond
    Normative social influence - acting like others because there is a social norm that prescribes doing as other do
    Informational social influence - acting like others because of a belief that others have better information about the correct thing to do
    Reference group - a set of people that someone looks to for information about what to do and what constitutes doing well, as well as evaluative comments and praise
    - orientation to a certain group depends on adolescents' social links and affiliations
    Similarity - more likely to observe/imitate those who seem to be like us
    Status - more likely to observe/imitate those who are admired or successful
    Social power - more likely to observe/imitate those who control resources that are important to us (ex .praise and criticism)
    Social comparison - the process of comparing one's status or performance to that of a particular reference gorup
    Self-reinforcement - rewarding or punishing oneself for what one considers a good or bad outcome of one's actions
    Need to belong - the drive to be part of the social group and to feel accepted by others
    Parental style related to dealing with pressure to conform to peers - adolescents with warm, accepting, moderately controlling parents are better relationships with peers
    - overly strict parents and permissive/neglecting parents - teens tend to turn more to peers for advice, leading to greater peer influence
    Status categories: popular, rejected, neglected, controversial, and average
    - neglected category - often shy and passive and keep from making social connections, but are not really upset about their status (p.190)

    (view changes)
    12:30 pm
  8. page Question 5 edited ... Attachment and Autonomy as Predictors of the Development of Social Skills and Delinquency Duri…
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    Attachment and Autonomy as Predictors of the Development of Social Skills and Delinquency During Midadolescence.mht
    This study found that adolescent attachment organization at age 16 predicted relative changes in levels of social skills and delinquent behavior. Overall attachment insecurity predicted decreases in social skills, and attachment preoccupation predicted relative increases in delinquency when it occurred in conjunction with high levels of maternal autonomy.
    Allen, J., Marsh, P., McFarland, C., McElhaney, K., Land, D. (2002). Attachment and autonomy as predictors of the development of social skills and delinquency during midadolescence. PubMed Central. February: 70(1), 56-66.
    The literature on puberty and girls was also very relatable to me as I thought about my own experiences.
    -Most girls feel embarrassment, self-consciousness, and worry about the hassle of supplies after their experience with menarche (Ruble & Brooks-Gunn, 1982).
    (view changes)
    10:28 am
  9. page Question 5 edited ... Outside research: Perceptions of autonomy support, parent attachment and self-worth.htm The s…
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    Outside research: Perceptions of autonomy support, parent attachment and self-worth.htm
    The study indicates that there is a positive link between parent attachment and motivational orientation. In particular, students with higher scores on the attachment measure also reported a greater preference for challenging tasks (i.e., an intrinsic motivational orientation).
    Attachment and Autonomy as Predictors of the Development of Social Skills and Delinquency During Midadolescence.mht
    This study found that adolescent attachment organization at age 16 predicted relative changes in levels of social skills and delinquent behavior. Overall attachment insecurity predicted decreases in social skills, and attachment preoccupation predicted relative increases in delinquency when it occurred in conjunction with high levels of maternal autonomy.

    The literature on puberty and girls was also very relatable to me as I thought about my own experiences.
    -Most girls feel embarrassment, self-consciousness, and worry about the hassle of supplies after their experience with menarche (Ruble & Brooks-Gunn, 1982).
    (view changes)
    10:19 am

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